Milestone 3 Weave Tech Student`s

Milestone3: Weave Tech

Milestone3: Weave Tech

  1. What type of employee relations issues might Weave Tech anticipate during a workforce reduction?

Despitethe signs that the company is performing well and making profits, theWeave-tech found it necessary to trim its workforce, particularly themanagers. This is an action that is likely to trigger lots ofreaction among the likely candidates for downsizing as well as thosethat are not privy to the exercise. The most likely reactions toanticipate include legal action against the organization, reducedmorale, reduced productivity and increased employee turnover.

  1. How might downsizing affect employee engagement and retention?

Downsizinghas a rather negative effect on employee engagement and employeeretention. However necessary the process may be from a businessperspective, reduction of the workforce causes a reduction in thevalue of an organization’s human capital. Organizations in theprocess of restructuring are 50 percent more likely to have lowengagement as compared to those not undergoing restructuring. It islikely that Weave-tech will focus on eliminating poor performerswhile retaining the top performing managers. However, this will notnecessarily translate to high engagement or retention levels of thetop performers. In reality, half of the top performers are lesslikely to be highly engaged, thereby increasing the likelihood ofdecreased engagement. Due to the low morale and uncertainty of thefuture, the top performers are more likely to leave the formvoluntarily in search of better jobs (Frank et.al. 2004).

  1. What method would you use to implement an immediate downsizing?

Asthe human resource manager at Weave-tech, the downsizing method Iwould most likely prefer is early retirement buyout. Early retirementis a way of encouraging more elderly employees to leave the firmearlier than their age of retirement. As an incentive to entice moreworkers to voluntarily leave the firm, the employer makes additionalpayment to avoid too much economic penalty until they are due forpension and social security benefits. The main reason why I wouldprefer this method is because the original purpose of reducing theworkforce shall be reduced, while at the same time the firm shalleliminate the negative effects that come with layoffs, firing andretrenchments. Despite the fact that this will come with up frontcosts, the organization shall ultimately save costs because therewill be no further payroll costs. I believe that retirement buyoutsare more humane ways of reducing staff as opposed to terminatingloyal and long serving employees. In addition to this, the exit istotally voluntary and this may be a way of eliminating discriminationsuits. In case of retrenchments, the organization may retainpotential poor workers who may not be comfortable working forWeave-tech. Offering the opportunity to voluntarily leave may be oneway of eliminating undedicated staff who may turn out to be poorperformers in the future.

  1. How does downsizing conflict with the psychological contract that previously existed at WeaveTech?

DuringJackson’s tenure, a memo to the effect that the organization wouldnever be involved in layoffs existed in the Employee Handbook.However, following the purchase, the memo was extracted from thehandbook, thereby allowing for layoffs as the management deemednecessary. The current need to downsize conflicts that earlier memo.This is because the memo had always acted as an informal assurancefor the employees about the security of their jobs. This meant thatthe employees had always concentrated on quality production asrequired of them by the management. The need to downsize willtherefore have negative effects on the productivity and morale levelsof the workers as stated earlier.

  1. Describe a complaint management procedure that ensures employee issues are heard by management

Inan organization, supervisors are charged with the responsibility ofmanaging employee concerns, complaints and problems. They must ensurethat timely resolutions are made, whether formally or informally. Inorder for the issue to be solved, the employee and supervisor mustmeet for the employee to raise their concerns after which thesupervisor must investigate the concerns and make their finaldecision. This is the final decision that the supervisor shalldiscuss with the employee as the solution to their concern. Dependingon whether the employee is satisfied or dissatisfied with theresolution, they may require to present their concerns to the nextlevel supervisor until they are finally satisfied with theresolution.

Aneffective employee complaint procedure may assume the form of an opendoor policy or periodic employee meetings. An open door policy makesit known to employees that that are free to approach the managementwhen faced with problems or complaints. Periodic employee meetingsare team-oriented because it involves allotting time for airingconcerns, complaints or problems during staff meetings.

  1. Describe a supervisory training program on conflict resolution that would be applicable to WeaveTech

Asupervisory training program on conflict resolution focuses on themanner in which supervisors should work with their staff to resolveconflicts at work. The training must equip the supervisors with theknowledge to easily recognize conflict, the causes of conflict, waysof resolving the conflict and managing relationships after resolvingthe conflicts. Training mainly revolves around interpersonal skillswhich include listening skills, effective communication skills,negotiation skills and conflict resolution skills. For supervisorshowever, the training must involve imparting other skills includingarbitration, informal mediation and professional mediation skills.

  1. What approach to employee discipline should be used at Weavetech?

Basedon progressive research into different organizational procedures ofdiscipline, more firms continue to deviate from progressive-discipleprocedures, leaning more towards positive-discipline procedures. Thisinvolves avoiding the punitive measures and embracing non-punitivemethods which require the employee to take personal responsibilityfor individual behavior, while making a commitment to performsatisfactorily if they wish to continue being employed.

However,there must be benchmark against which performance or good behavior ismeasured. WeaveTech must come up with a code of ethics document thatoutlines the expectations of the organization for the employees. Acode of conduct document clarifies the standards of behavior expectedof staff, and must be communicated to the employees without fail.

III.A. Complaint procedure

  1. Discussion with supervisor: The employee must initially air their concerns with immediate supervisor. However, if the complaint is against the supervisor, the employee may report the matter to the supervisor’s superior or speak to the specific supervisor if they are comfortable doing so. A response must be made within five working days of the initial complaint.

  2. Written complaint and decision: Should the immediate supervisor fail to respond within the required time, or if the resolution fails to satisfy the complainant, this may be escalated to the departmental head or the supervisor’s manager. Date of incident and copy of initial response from supervisor must be presented to the departmental head at this juncture. Once the departmental head has received the complaint, they must respond by seeking audience with the complainant and the supervisor, after which a resolution must be submitted to the complainant, and copied to the supervisor.

  3. Appeal of decision: Further dissatisfaction by the employee requires appealing to the HR manager/ department within reasonable time. This must be done in writing, enclosing all earlier resolutions by immediate supervisor and departmental head. The HR department may request a meeting with the parties concerned to facilitate a resolution. If need be, a review committee may be contacted especially if the issue concerns matters of policy.

B.Discipline process

1.Oral reprimand: Upon receipt of an employee’s performance problems,the supervisor issues an oral reprimand that involves finding outwhether there are any concerns or deficiencies needing attention

2.Written warning: Should the problem persist, or more emerge, theemployee is issued with a written warning detailing the behavior inquestion and the outcomes.

3.Final written warning: If there is still no improvement, a finalwritten warning should be delivered, accompanied by copies ofprevious warnings. It should indicate particular areas forimprovement and specific time frames within which to improve.

4.Termination review: The persistent problem must be reported to HR atthis juncture for evaluation and consideration of the dischargerelated issues.

5.Termination: This step should only be undertaken once the above stepshave failed. This means that the employee has been granted everyconceivable opportunity to amend their behavior to no avail.

C.Conflict resolution procedure

1.Identify the source of the conflict: Gather as much information aspossible. Listen attentively and evaluate responses from all partiesinvolved

2.Look beyond the incident: There may be earlier incidences thathappened and have only just been triggered by a minor incident.Listen attentively and evaluate responses from all parties

3.Request solutions: After listening to each of the party’s point ofview, it is crucial to ask them whether they have any solutions tothe situation at hand. Listen attentively and evaluate both parties’responses

4. Identify solutions and present to the parties. Ask for theiropinions on the same. The solutions must also be in favor of theorganization and the management

5.Agreement: The mediation skills of the supervisor come in handy atthis point as he gets to make the two parties agree to thealternatives identified earlier. It could be crucial to write downthe agreements and also have the parties agree on actions to take incase they are faced with such disputes in future.

References

Franket.al. (2004). The Race for Talent: Retaining and Engaging Workers inthe 21stCentury. Human Resource Planning. 27(3) 12-25

Vance,C.M. &amp Paik, Y. (2014). Managing a Global Workforce: Challengesand Opportunities in International Human Resource Management. London.Routledge

Milestone 3 Weave Tech Student`s

Milestone3: Weave Tech

Milestone3: Weave Tech

  1. What type of employee relations issues might Weave Tech anticipate during a workforce reduction?

Despitethe signs that the company is performing well and making profits, theWeave-tech found it necessary to trim its workforce, particularly themanagers. This is an action that is likely to trigger lots ofreaction among the likely candidates for downsizing as well as thosethat are not privy to the exercise. The most likely reactions toanticipate include legal action against the organization, reducedmorale, reduced productivity and increased employee turnover.

  1. How might downsizing affect employee engagement and retention?

Downsizinghas a rather negative effect on employee engagement and employeeretention. However necessary the process may be from a businessperspective, reduction of the workforce causes a reduction in thevalue of an organization’s human capital. Organizations in theprocess of restructuring are 50 percent more likely to have lowengagement as compared to those not undergoing restructuring. It islikely that Weave-tech will focus on eliminating poor performerswhile retaining the top performing managers. However, this will notnecessarily translate to high engagement or retention levels of thetop performers. In reality, half of the top performers are lesslikely to be highly engaged, thereby increasing the likelihood ofdecreased engagement. Due to the low morale and uncertainty of thefuture, the top performers are more likely to leave the formvoluntarily in search of better jobs (Frank et.al. 2004).

  1. What method would you use to implement an immediate downsizing?

Asthe human resource manager at Weave-tech, the downsizing method Iwould most likely prefer is early retirement buyout. Early retirementis a way of encouraging more elderly employees to leave the firmearlier than their age of retirement. As an incentive to entice moreworkers to voluntarily leave the firm, the employer makes additionalpayment to avoid too much economic penalty until they are due forpension and social security benefits. The main reason why I wouldprefer this method is because the original purpose of reducing theworkforce shall be reduced, while at the same time the firm shalleliminate the negative effects that come with layoffs, firing andretrenchments. Despite the fact that this will come with up frontcosts, the organization shall ultimately save costs because therewill be no further payroll costs. I believe that retirement buyoutsare more humane ways of reducing staff as opposed to terminatingloyal and long serving employees. In addition to this, the exit istotally voluntary and this may be a way of eliminating discriminationsuits. In case of retrenchments, the organization may retainpotential poor workers who may not be comfortable working forWeave-tech. Offering the opportunity to voluntarily leave may be oneway of eliminating undedicated staff who may turn out to be poorperformers in the future.

  1. How does downsizing conflict with the psychological contract that previously existed at WeaveTech?

DuringJackson’s tenure, a memo to the effect that the organization wouldnever be involved in layoffs existed in the Employee Handbook.However, following the purchase, the memo was extracted from thehandbook, thereby allowing for layoffs as the management deemednecessary. The current need to downsize conflicts that earlier memo.This is because the memo had always acted as an informal assurancefor the employees about the security of their jobs. This meant thatthe employees had always concentrated on quality production asrequired of them by the management. The need to downsize willtherefore have negative effects on the productivity and morale levelsof the workers as stated earlier.

  1. Describe a complaint management procedure that ensures employee issues are heard by management

Inan organization, supervisors are charged with the responsibility ofmanaging employee concerns, complaints and problems. They must ensurethat timely resolutions are made, whether formally or informally. Inorder for the issue to be solved, the employee and supervisor mustmeet for the employee to raise their concerns after which thesupervisor must investigate the concerns and make their finaldecision. This is the final decision that the supervisor shalldiscuss with the employee as the solution to their concern. Dependingon whether the employee is satisfied or dissatisfied with theresolution, they may require to present their concerns to the nextlevel supervisor until they are finally satisfied with theresolution.

Aneffective employee complaint procedure may assume the form of an opendoor policy or periodic employee meetings. An open door policy makesit known to employees that that are free to approach the managementwhen faced with problems or complaints. Periodic employee meetingsare team-oriented because it involves allotting time for airingconcerns, complaints or problems during staff meetings.

  1. Describe a supervisory training program on conflict resolution that would be applicable to WeaveTech

Asupervisory training program on conflict resolution focuses on themanner in which supervisors should work with their staff to resolveconflicts at work. The training must equip the supervisors with theknowledge to easily recognize conflict, the causes of conflict, waysof resolving the conflict and managing relationships after resolvingthe conflicts. Training mainly revolves around interpersonal skillswhich include listening skills, effective communication skills,negotiation skills and conflict resolution skills. For supervisorshowever, the training must involve imparting other skills includingarbitration, informal mediation and professional mediation skills.

  1. What approach to employee discipline should be used at Weavetech?

Basedon progressive research into different organizational procedures ofdiscipline, more firms continue to deviate from progressive-discipleprocedures, leaning more towards positive-discipline procedures. Thisinvolves avoiding the punitive measures and embracing non-punitivemethods which require the employee to take personal responsibilityfor individual behavior, while making a commitment to performsatisfactorily if they wish to continue being employed.

However,there must be benchmark against which performance or good behavior ismeasured. WeaveTech must come up with a code of ethics document thatoutlines the expectations of the organization for the employees. Acode of conduct document clarifies the standards of behavior expectedof staff, and must be communicated to the employees without fail.

III.A. Complaint procedure

  1. Discussion with supervisor: The employee must initially air their concerns with immediate supervisor. However, if the complaint is against the supervisor, the employee may report the matter to the supervisor’s superior or speak to the specific supervisor if they are comfortable doing so. A response must be made within five working days of the initial complaint.

  2. Written complaint and decision: Should the immediate supervisor fail to respond within the required time, or if the resolution fails to satisfy the complainant, this may be escalated to the departmental head or the supervisor’s manager. Date of incident and copy of initial response from supervisor must be presented to the departmental head at this juncture. Once the departmental head has received the complaint, they must respond by seeking audience with the complainant and the supervisor, after which a resolution must be submitted to the complainant, and copied to the supervisor.

  3. Appeal of decision: Further dissatisfaction by the employee requires appealing to the HR manager/ department within reasonable time. This must be done in writing, enclosing all earlier resolutions by immediate supervisor and departmental head. The HR department may request a meeting with the parties concerned to facilitate a resolution. If need be, a review committee may be contacted especially if the issue concerns matters of policy.

B.Discipline process

1.Oral reprimand: Upon receipt of an employee’s performance problems,the supervisor issues an oral reprimand that involves finding outwhether there are any concerns or deficiencies needing attention

2.Written warning: Should the problem persist, or more emerge, theemployee is issued with a written warning detailing the behavior inquestion and the outcomes.

3.Final written warning: If there is still no improvement, a finalwritten warning should be delivered, accompanied by copies ofprevious warnings. It should indicate particular areas forimprovement and specific time frames within which to improve.

4.Termination review: The persistent problem must be reported to HR atthis juncture for evaluation and consideration of the dischargerelated issues.

5.Termination: This step should only be undertaken once the above stepshave failed. This means that the employee has been granted everyconceivable opportunity to amend their behavior to no avail.

C.Conflict resolution procedure

1.Identify the source of the conflict: Gather as much information aspossible. Listen attentively and evaluate responses from all partiesinvolved

2.Look beyond the incident: There may be earlier incidences thathappened and have only just been triggered by a minor incident.Listen attentively and evaluate responses from all parties

3.Request solutions: After listening to each of the party’s point ofview, it is crucial to ask them whether they have any solutions tothe situation at hand. Listen attentively and evaluate both parties’responses

4. Identify solutions and present to the parties. Ask for theiropinions on the same. The solutions must also be in favor of theorganization and the management

5.Agreement: The mediation skills of the supervisor come in handy atthis point as he gets to make the two parties agree to thealternatives identified earlier. It could be crucial to write downthe agreements and also have the parties agree on actions to take incase they are faced with such disputes in future.

References

Franket.al. (2004). The Race for Talent: Retaining and Engaging Workers inthe 21stCentury. Human Resource Planning. 27(3) 12-25

Vance,C.M. &amp Paik, Y. (2014). Managing a Global Workforce: Challengesand Opportunities in International Human Resource Management. London.Routledge