Note to researchers distributing this scale please only use after reading instructions in “Manual for Researchers”.

Page 1

MICA-4

Mental Illness: Clinicians’ Attitudes Scale

Note to researchers distributing this scale: please only use after reading instructions in “Manual for Researchers”.

Instructions: for each of questions 1-16, please respond by ticking one box only. Mental illness here refers to conditions for which an individual would be seen by a psychiatrist. Type in an ‘x’ in the box that best represents your attitude.

Strongly

Agree

Somewhat

Somewhat

Disagree

Strongly

agree

agree

disagree

disagree

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Mental Illness: Clinicians’ Attitudes Scale MICA-2 © 2010. Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. We would like to thank Aliya Kassam for her major contribution to the development of this scale.

Contact: Professor Graham Thornicroft. Email: [email protected]

Kassam A., Glozier N., Leese M., Henderson C., Thornicroft G. (2010) Development and responsiveness of a scale to measure clinicians` attitudes to people with mental illness (medical student version). Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 122(2), 153-161.

Notetoresearchersdistributingthisscale:pleaseonlyuseafterreadinginstructionsin“ManualforResearchers”.

Instructions:foreachofquestions1-16,pleaserespondbytickingoneboxonly.Mentalillnessherereferstoconditionsforwhichanindividualwouldbeseenbyapsychiatrist.

Strongly

Agree

Somewhat

Somewhat

Disagree

Strongly

agree

x

agree

disagree

disagree

10

I feel as comfortable talking to a person with a mental illness as I do talking to a person with a physical illness.

x

12

x

The public does not need to be protected from people with a severe mental illness.

x

14

x

General practitioners should

a thorough assessment for

people with psychiatric symptoms because they can be referred to a psychiatrist.

I would use the terms ‘crazy’, ‘nutter’, ‘mad’ etc. to describe to colleagues people with a mental illness who I have seen in my work.

15

x

16

x

If a colleague told me they had a mental illness, I would still want to work with them.

Thank you very much for your help.

Mental Illness: Clinicians’ Attitudes Scale MICA-2 © 2010. Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. We would like to thank Aliya Kassam for her major contribution to the development of this scale.

Contact: Professor Graham Thornicroft. Email: [email protected]

Kassam A., Glozier N., Leese M., Henderson C., Thornicroft G. (2010) Development and responsiveness of a scale to measure clinicians` attitudes to people withental illness (medical student version). Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 122(2), 153-161.

Question 6

I strongly agree with this opinion because I believe patients treated for mental health feel more confident after talking to their doctors rather than their family members or friends. The fear of being treated differently by other members of the family leads patients to share information that may be considered sensitive or personal with their doctors. Some patients also believe that sharing more information about themselves will result in a better medical intervention and faster recovery.

Question 9

I strongly agree that every human being has a right to be treated with respect and dignity. Therefore, any health care expert should not be allowed to treat patients differently based on their physical or mental condition. Respecting a patient results in mutual trust and a better patient-doctor relationship. This in turn ensures that the patient’s need are handled effectively and efficiently.

Question 12

I believe that patients suffering from severe mental illness should be supervised most of the time in order to protect the public from any potential danger. While not all the patients would need to be housed in a mental health institution, they would still require close supervision to ensure that their daily activities / routines do not pose a threat to other people and to themselves.

In conclusion, it should be noted that a clinician’s attitude towards a patient may either support or hinder recovery. A positive attitude will enhance and support treatment while a negative attitude will sideline the patient and delay treatment. Clinicians should therefore be advised to recognize their own attitudes and biases and their impact on the occupational therapy process. Positive attitudes associated with improved patient care include: having interest in the patient, playing an active role in patient care and addressing to the patient’s needs in a timely manner (Bartlem et al., 2016).

References

Bartlem, K., Bowman, J., Ross, K., Freund, M., Wye, P., McElwaine, K., Gillham, K., Doherty, E., Wolfenden, L., &amp Wiggers, J. (2016). Mental health clinician attitudes to the provision of preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviors and association with care provision. BMC Psychiatry. Retrieved from https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12888-016-0763-3