Nutrition Nutrition

Nutrition

Nutrition

Arimond,M., Hawkes, C., Ruel, M. T., Sifri, Z., Berti, P. R., Leroy, J. &ampAmoroso, L. (2011). Agricultural interventions and nutrition: Lessonsfrom the past and new evidence. In B. Thompson &amp L. Amoroso(Eds.), Combatingmicronutrient deficiencies: Food-based approaches.CABI Publishing.

Theauthors obtain data from existing reviews before performing asystematic analysis to recognize agricultural interventions with hugeeffects on nutritional indicators and dietary diversity. Theyrevealed that interventions led to enhanced nutritional status anddietary quality. However, one of the limitations of the paper wasthat it failed to discuss comprehensively the methodologicalweaknesses and strengths of the cases used.

Bhagowalia,P., Headey, D., &amp Kidayala, S. (2012). Agriculture,Income, Nutrition Linkages in India. Insights from a NationallyRepresentative Survey.IFPRI Discussion Paper No. 01195. Washington, DC: International FoodPolicy Research Institute.

Thesurvey estimates the impacts of variables, such as agricultural andincome production methods on dietary diversity, stunting and wastageusing statistics from the 2004/2005 India Human and DevelopmentSurvey. The authors recommend irrigation, cattle and poultry rearingto improve diets. One limitation of the study was unavailable dataregarding intra-household food allocation whose consideration iscrucial in any future interventions.

Bouis,H. &amp Islam, Y. (2012). Biofortification: Leveraging Agricultureto Reduce Hidden Hunger. In S. Fan and R. Pandya-Lorch (Eds.),ReshapingAgriculture for Nutrition and Health. An IFPRI 2020 Book (83-92).Washington, DC: International Food Policy Research Institute.

Theauthors call Biofortification the scientific practice that increasesnutrients in staple foods through transgenetic and traditional plantbreeding. They discuss the benefits of Biofortification, especiallywith respect to its ability to reach poor people in the rural areaswho mostly consume staple foods. The paper discusses the limitationsand challenges of Biofortification as well. Nevertheless, the authorsprovide a summary regarding the farming of orange sweet potato inMozambique and Uganda. They argue that the food enhances Vitamin A inchildren.

Brody,J. E. (2012, October 29). There’s Homework to Do on School Lunches.The New York Times, D7.

Thearticle concentrates on ways of making school lunch better. The newstandards introduced by the Department of Agriculture for schoollunches nationwide intend to address the obesity epidemic amongschool children. The standards recommend two-third vegetables andfruits on lunches. However, the article maintains that the strategyneeds time to help children adjust to the new lifestyle. The articlehelped me understand the effects of obesity in schools and theefforts needed to stop it in elementary schools.

Burchi,F., Fanzo, J. &amp Frison, E. (2011). The Role of Food and NutritionSystem Approaches in Tackling Hidden Hunger. InternationalJournal of Environmental Research and Public Health,8(2), 358-373.

Theauthors offer a classical summary of agricultural strategies, such asthe methods used in the 1970s and the modern farming methods intendedto tackle micronutrient deficiencies. They highlight the weaknessesnoted in the literature regarding the traditional agriculturalapproaches and recommend a more holistic and sustainable strategy tonutrition. The authors fail to assess the methodology of nutrition oragricultural studies.

Burke,L. E., &amp Wang, J. (2011, September 6). Treatment Strategies forOverweight and Obesity. Journalof Nursing Scholarship.doi: 10.1111/j.1547-5069.2011.01424.x

Burkeand Wang discuss treatment strategies, reviews, targets, lifestylechanges, standard behavior therapy, bariatric surgery andpharmacotherapy. Standard behavior therapy includes behavior therapy,physical activity and diet component. The article clarifies thesignificance of advocating lifestyle modification alongside bariatricsurgery and pharmacotherapy to receive complete benefits. I found thearticle beneficial to my research because it highlights theincreasing numbers of obesity and the role of health care experts intackling the issue.

Gomez,G. L. (2012, October 19). When did obesity become an issue? NaturalNews. Retrieved November, 6, 2012 fromhttp://www.naturalnews.com/037596_obesity_statistics_junk_f ood.html

Thearticle locates the sources of obesity. Gomez argues that obesity hasdoubled and tripled in adults and children respectively. He blamesaltered eating habits and sedentary lifestyles for the increasedrates of obesity. He also blames huge food portions, desk jobs andthe excessive use of electronic devices, such as TVs, game systemsand computers as well. According to him, fast food joints providezero health options for people. However the article was crucial formy research since it revealed the sources of obesity and the adverseimpacts of technology and people’s refusal to embrace outsideactivities.

Hawkes,C. &amp Ruel, M. (2011). ValueChains for Nutrition.IFPRI 2020 Conference Paper 4. Washington, DC: International FoodPolicy Research Institute.

Theauthors write a literature summary on value chains and offer casestudies to demonstrate the perception of using value chain to improvenutrition. They explain value chains, diverse uses of value chainanalysis and how value chain strategies could improve the demand andsupply of nutritious foods. They also present the pros and cons ofemploying a value chain approach. They also use eight case studies toexplain the value chain concept.

Masset,E., Haddad, L., Cornelius, A. &amp Isaza-Castro, J. (2012).Effectiveness of Agricultural Interventions that Aim to ImproveNutritional Status of Children: Systematic Review. BMJ2012 344: d8222.

Theauthors conduct a systematic analysis to recognize studies thatassess the impacts of agricultural interventions includingbiofortification and gardening on the nutritional status of kids indeveloping nations. They used 23 studies. One limitation of the studywas that the authors found most study designs to be faulty, hencemaking it challenging to determine the success or lack thereof of theinterventions.

Strom,S. (2011, July 26). McDonald’s Alters Happy Meals and ShrinksFries. TheNew York Times.Retrieved fromhttp://prescriptions.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/26/mcdonalds-alters-happy-meals-shrinks-fries/?ref=weight

Thisarticle discusses McDonald’s response to anti-obesity campaigns,such as reducing fries and adding fruits on their menu. The hotelchain set an objective to cut back calories by 20 percent. Thearticle was crucial in my study as it showed the effectiveness ofanti-obesity campaigns.

Sun,L. H. (2011). Adult obesity rates expand in 16 states D.C. weighs inas second-slimmest. TheWashington Post.Section A, Pg. A16. Retrieved fromhttp://0-www.lexisnexis.com.lib.utep.edu/hottopics/lnacademic/

Thejournal discusses the increased obesity levels in the United States.The authors maintain that obesity rose in 16 states and did notreduce in any state. Moreover, the rate of obesity in Colorado fallsbelow 20 percent while 38 other states experience over 25 percent.The article highlights the trends experienced over the last 20 yearsand maintains that illiteracy, low income and ethnic/racialminorities experience increased obesity rates overall. The journalremained crucial to my study since it revealed the prevalence ofobesity due to poor nutrition in the United States.

Webb,P. &amp Kennedy, E. (2012). Impactsof Agriculture on Nutrition: Nature of the Evidence and ResearchGaps.Nutrition CRSP Brief Number 4. Retrieved fromhttp://www.fsnnetwork.org/sites/default/files/ncrp_research_brief_no._4_impacts_of_agroculture_on_nutrition_-_review_of_evidence_oct_2012_v3.pdf

Webband Kennedy use nine reviews issued in 2000 regarding the impacts ofagricultural interventions on nutrition. They discover variousconsistent themes during those reviews. They argue that increasedincome, better diet and the intake of the required micronutrientsincrease child development. The authors maintain that inadequateevidence obstructs investment and policy advocacy.

References

Arimond,M., Hawkes, C., Ruel, M. T., Sifri, Z., Berti, P. R., Leroy, J. &ampAmoroso, L. (2011). Agricultural interventions and nutrition: Lessonsfrom the past and new evidence. In B. Thompson &amp L. Amoroso(Eds.), Combatingmicronutrient deficiencies: Food-based approaches.CABI Publishing.

Bhagowalia,P., Headey, D., &amp Kidayala, S. (2012). Agriculture,Income, Nutrition Linkages in India. Insights from a NationallyRepresentative Survey.IFPRI Discussion Paper No. 01195. Washington, DC: International FoodPolicy Research Institute.

Bouis,H. &amp Islam, Y. (2012). Biofortification: Leveraging Agricultureto Reduce Hidden Hunger. In S. Fan and R. Pandya-Lorch (Eds.),ReshapingAgriculture for Nutrition and Health. An IFPRI 2020 Book (83-92).Washington, DC: International Food Policy Research Institute.

Brody,J. E. (2012, October 29). There’s Homework to Do on School Lunches.The New York Times, D7.

Burchi,F., Fanzo, J. &amp Frison, E. (2011). The Role of Food and NutritionSystem Approaches in Tackling Hidden Hunger. InternationalJournal of Environmental Research and Public Health,8(2), 358-373.

Burke,L. E., &amp Wang, J. (2011, September 6). Treatment Strategies forOverweight and Obesity. Journalof Nursing Scholarship.doi: 10.1111/j.1547-5069.2011.01424.x

Gomez,G. L. (2012, October 19). When did obesity become an issue? NaturalNews. Retrieved November, 6, 2012 fromhttp://www.naturalnews.com/037596_obesity_statistics_junk_f ood.html

Hawkes,C. &amp Ruel, M. (2011). ValueChains for Nutrition.IFPRI 2020 Conference Paper 4. Washington, DC: International FoodPolicy Research Institute.

Masset,E., Haddad, L., Cornelius, A. &amp Isaza-Castro, J. (2012).Effectiveness of Agricultural Interventions that Aim to ImproveNutritional Status of Children: Systematic Review. BMJ2012 344: d8222.

Strom,S. (2011, July 26). McDonald’s Alters Happy Meals and ShrinksFries. TheNew York Times.Retrieved fromhttp://prescriptions.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/26/mcdonalds-alters-happy-meals-shrinks-fries/?ref=weight

Sun,L. H. (2011). Adult obesity rates expand in 16 states D.C. weighs inas second-slimmest. TheWashington Post.Section A, Pg. A16. Retrieved fromhttp://0-www.lexisnexis.com.lib.utep.edu/hottopics/lnacademic/

Webb,P. &amp Kennedy, E. (2012). Impactsof Agriculture on Nutrition: Nature of the Evidence and ResearchGaps.Nutrition CRSP Brief Number 4. Retrieved fromhttp://www.fsnnetwork.org/sites/default/files/ncrp_research_brief_no._4_impacts_of_agroculture_on_nutrition_-_review_of_evidence_oct_2012_v3.pdf