Prisons` Activities

Prisons’Activities

Prison’sActivities

Discussionone

Whoare the staff in a prison? Give a profile by age, sex, education,experience, etc. for your state correctional officer.

Thevarious types of jobs in a prison follow a particular profile. Withtime, the roles of the jail workers keep on changing due to theincrease in the diversity of crimes and an increase in the numbersconvicts landing in the jails. Male prison officers are in jailshousing male prisoners, while female jail officers are in the womenprisons since each gender is housed separately. Typically, anindividual must hold an American citizenship to work in the nation’sprisons. With increased experience, the jail officers rank up tobecome captains and wardens.

Whatdo you think life is for an inmate in a prison?

Typically,prison life is not appealing to most of the people. When the inmatescome to jail, there is a health screen, a photo to attach to the ID,and a shower. As a result, the life of an inmate adjusts to aconstant cycle of following rules, working, and evading danger in theprison. Through the daily encounters, some will shuffle along whileothers wish they would shuffle. There are those who have to be pushedaround, and some form smooth straight queues while attending to thevarious designated areas. The prisoners are divided into groups whichthey work together in particular areas, and they are rewardedaccordingly. Upon working, the expenses of the inmates are deductedfrom their earnings. The accommodation in the prisons depends on thecrimes committed by the prisoners, the type of medical condition, andthe mental state (Petersilia, 2003).

Whydo inmates tend to organize gangs in prisons?

Aninmate joins a gang since the gangs in the prisons offer rules andregulations that guide the social conduct. The rules help protectmembers of a similar section from the harm presented by another gang.This is because most of the prisons are overcrowded, and the wardensand the prison officers cannot provide adequate protection to all theinmates. More so, the gangs promote the social order by adjudicatingdifferences. The inmates cannot report to the officials the illegalactivities in the prisons hence, the groups act as a method tocontrol such illegal activities in the jails. For instance, aprisoner cannot report to the officials if his marijuana stash isstolen, such cases are solved by the gang leaders.

Discussiontwo

Whenthe police protecting the community kill someone, they may end up ascriminals or heroes. There are debates, strikes, heightened racialtensions whenever a white cop shoots a black citizen. Reportsindicate that the people killed by police were in either of thesethree conditions. They were wielding weapons, they ran when thepolice ordered them to stop, or their intentions were suicidal andhad mental challenges. The African-American community has been on thereceiving end of such shootings, with the standard explanationarising that the black lives seem to be of low-value. However, thepolice also gun down white citizens. In these scenarios, the killingsof whites and excessive use of force by police while encounteringwhites goes unexplained. The reports do not even surface to the mediastations. Reports from the FBI show that killings done by police endup being justified. In these justified killings, thirty-two percentinvolve killing a black, while the other sixty-four percent are thewhites (Walker, 2012). Most strikes and tensions will revolve thekilling of a black citizen, ignoring the murder of the whitecitizens. With the current technological progress, there is increasedvideo evidence of the police shooting in the various communities. Tothe police chiefs and lawmakers, the videos showing police shootingshelp to absolve the cops from all the accusations. To the public andthe various activists, the videos act as direct evidence that thepolice act abusively, and the video eliminate any possible cover-upsmade by the police.

References

Walker,S., &amp Katz, C. M. (2012). Policein America.McGraw-Hill.

Petersilia,J. (2003).&nbspWhenprisoners come home: Parole and prisoner reentry.Oxford University Press.